November 18, 2016

A Thing of State

A Thing of State

A classic political thriller by Pulitzer Prize-winning master Allen Drury. The U.S. President engages in a clash of wills with Sidi bin Sidi bin Sidi, leader of a tiny Middle Eastern country. Sidi has r ecently acquired several nuclear weapons and threatens to deploy them against his even tinier neighbor, and the President is determined to take him down. No author has ever portrayed American and world politics with more vivid reality and understanding than Allen Drury.

In the conduct of foreign policy, a President must never utter threats he can’t—or won’t—enforce, make promises he can’t—or won’t—keep, or renege on commitments to his allies. This classic political thriller by Pulitzer Prize-winning master Allen Drury is as insightful and relevant today as when it was first published. Secretary of State Raymond Cass Stanley struggles to help the U.S. President avoid a potentially disastrous head-on collision with Sidi bin Sidi bin Sidi, President for Life of All the Peoples of Lolómé, a tiny Middle Eastern country. Sidi has recently acquired several nuclear weapons and threatens to deploy them against his even tinier neighbor, Lesser Lolómé, and the President is determined to take him down. This clash among proud and defiant leaders, and the repercussions worldwide among US allies and enemies, forms a sophisticated and fascinating novel of present-day politics and international tensions. No author has ever portrayed American and world politics with more vivid reality and understanding than Allen Drury.
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About the Author
Allen Drury

Allen Drury (1918–1998) was a master of political fiction, #1 New York Times bestseller and Pulitzer Prize winner, best known for the landmark novel Advise and Consent. A 1939 graduate of Stanford University, Drury wrote for and became editor of two local California newspapers. While visiting Washington, DC, in 1943 he was hired by the United Press (UPI) and covered the Senate during the latter half of World War II. After the war he wrote for other prominent publications before joining the New York Times' Washington Bureau, where he worked through most of the 1950s. After the success of Advise and Consent, he left journalism to write full time. He published twenty novels and five works of non-fiction, many of them best sellers. WordFire Press will be reissuing the majority of his works.

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